Healthcare Analytics: Test the Waters Before You Dive In

Analytics as a Differentiator

Many healthcare organizations see the use of analytics as a primary differentiator in the journey to value-based care. The current analytics vendor marketplace includes:

  • Niche and point analytics systems (solutions focused on one functional area – marketing, finance, clinical, claims, quality measurement, human resources, etc.)
  • Enterprise analytics tools that are part of larger offerings such as ERP and EHR
  • Enterprise data repositories, data lakes and tools to support data normalization, aggregation, visualization, etc.
  • Extended enterprise systems such as care management platforms to support population health management and consumer activation
  • External industry comparative data sets

Most health systems use these systems for a variety of analyses including:

  • Descriptive analytics – to answer questions such as what happened; how many, how often, where, who…; what exactly is the problem; how did we perform, etc.?
  • Diagnostic analytics – to answer why is this happening and what are the trends?
  • Predictive analytics – to answer what will happen?
  • Prescriptive analytics – to answer how do we make it happen?

Advanced organizations are moving into Continuous Intelligence (CI). Rather than depending on traditional score cards, which require people to orchestrate every step in the analysis, CI uses artificial intelligence and machine-based algorithms to automatically interpret and harmonize the data. CI continuously discovers patterns and learns what’s of value in the data, and immediately sends insights to decision makers. In healthcare, this will be extremely valuable at the point of care, for care managers working across the continuum and for strategists who need agility in their decision-making processes.

Demonstration Projects Help “Test the Waters”

Yet, healthcare leaders often struggle with basic analytics projects. In fact, Gartner has uncovered an 85% failure rate on data projects. Ironically, this may be in part the result of executives trusting their gut rather than the insights derived from the data. Other problems include political, data quality challenges, limited data interpretation skillsets, resistance to change, governance, etc. It is often helpful, prior to jumping in the deep end of the analytics pool for the organization to first:

  • Learn new ways to think about data
  • Collaborate on new ways to use data
  • Leverage existing analytics tools and resources prior to making significant analytics investments
  • Develop consistent methods for defining the problem to be solved, defining the data, cleaning up data inconsistencies and improve on data presentation skills

In other words, “test the waters” prior to diving in. A Demonstration Project provides the ability to learn about insight-driven decision making through the execution of a clearly defined project. The Demonstration Project works best with a limited scope, limited resource commitment and within a short time frame. An Analytics Demonstration Project focuses on data quality, building trust and deploying a consistent data management methodology. Insights can be channeled into performance improvement projects, strategic and operational plans or other pertinent initiatives.

Leading Demonstration Projects

Often a “See One”, “Do One”, “Lead One” approach works well — an outside analytics advisor partners with the organization and leads the first project, the advisor partners with the organization on the second project and in the third project, the organization leads the project with the advisor serving as a mentor. Preparation and starting the project well are essential elements for success and key steps include:

  • Understand the problems you are trying to solve: Many organizations acquire solutions before they have identified what the organizational “points of pain” are. This results in multiple tools or platforms competing for leadership attention, budget dollars and resources. Identifying the problems you are trying to address, or the questions you are trying to answer will help prioritize the use of limited analytics capacity.
  • Evaluate your existing investments in analytics tools, systems and methodologies: It is essential to understand your current analytic tools footprint. Rather than jumping to acquire a new analytics system or service, you may find you are able to leverage existing investments. Over time, the lessons learned from successful Demonstration Projects will identify opportunities to improve your overall Analytics Strategy. Specifics may include rationalization of  duplicate systems and addition of new capabilities to close gaps based on your existing vendor’s development road map.
  • Break Data Analytics projects into smaller waves versus a big bang deployment: Focused sprints, using an agile methodology rather than a traditional IT waterfall project implementation plan, shifts the focus to performance improvement. For the purpose of planning a Demonstration Project there are many ways to break the problem into smaller, targeted efforts. So for example, a Sepsis prevention and reduction effort can be divided into multiple smaller Demonstration Projects including descriptive and diagnostic analysis of sepsis rates, use of data driven screening tools or protocols, sepsis prediction tools, stakeholder education through data, etc.
  • Ensure data integrity: Source systems (such as your EMR or niche systems) have varying quality of data. Oftentimes data are missing or stored in different places depending on clinical documentation practices. In addition, definitions of data may vary from system to system or even from stakeholder to stakeholder. A common “Data Dictionary” becomes essential. Demonstration Projects can be useful defining organizational steps in developing the data dictionary, mining data, validating data, creating data baselines, analyzing data, presenting and visualizing data, and developing a go-forward data improvement plan.
  • Communicate benefits to the organization, including executives: Use techniques to model value and even Return on Investment/Value of Investment. By showing how Data Analytics initiatives impact strategic goals as well as daily operations, the organization can begin take a holistic view and integrate insight-driven decision making at all levels of the enterprise.

Organizations who leverage the strategic value of data to make informed decisions will be the ones who not only survive, but thrive.

 

Data – The Star of the Show

One-week post #HIMSS19, blogs and articles are using phrases like “no one unifying theme”, “something for everyone”, “the invasion of non-healthcare high tech” and “the end of the EHR movement” to summarize the global conference key take-aways. Even though the exhibition showcased interoperability, artificial intelligence, telehealth, security, the internet of things, precision medicine and more, the focus was not on these technologies. In fact, a more subtle underlying reality was clear in both the education sessions and vendor booths. Data is the star of the show!

Data in the Spotlight at HIMSS

Data collection, data integrity and quality, data access, data for benchmarking and comparative analysis, data protection and safety, data as part of care management platforms, data analysis and prediction, data visualization and ultimately, the transformation of data into information each had the spotlight. Data and analytics vendors were certainly a major focus of the show. These vendors were not outdone by solutions which offered data a by-product of a much more comprehensive offering such as Enterprise Resource Planning or data embedded within cloud-based services designed to solve specific business and clinical problems such as readmissions. Moreover, CMS took center stage in multiple forums to discuss the Interoperability and Patient Access Proposed Rule. With a goal to touch all aspects of healthcare, from patients to providers to payers to researchers, “CMS hopes to break down existing barriers to important data exchange needed to empower patients by given them access to their health data,” CMS Administrator Seema Verma indicated. HIMSS even gotten directly into the act. Recognizing the importance of data and information, they have changed their vision statement from “better health through IT” to “better health through information and technology.”

Siloed Organizations and Turf Battles

Yet, even with all of this attention and applause its hard to reconcile the maturity of data initiatives in many health and healthcare organizations today and the challenges faced by many. For data to be valuable, data must be converted into information, information into insights, insights into decisions, and decisions into action. Unfortunately, many health and healthcare still manage their data assets within siloed organization structures. Turf battles are common. Data-related issues for decision makers often include:

  • Confusion over who “owns” data and analytics
  • Questions regarding centralization versus decentralization of analytics resources and tools
  • Limited trust in the data and reports created by other parts of the organization often resulting in considerable rework
  • Inconsistent data definitions, duplicate data sources and systems, and costly resource requirements
  • Analysts who don’t understand the problem to be solved when data requests are “thrown over the fence”
  • Proliferation of spreadsheets, manual manipulation of score cards, and limited automation
  • Delays and slow turnaround of data requests
  • Data repositories that create many but rarely used reports
  • An inability to fully appreciate much less realize the benefits of big data, and predictive and prescriptive analysis

According to thought leaders at SAP, “less than 1% of the world’s data in business is analyzed and turned into benefits”.

The Enterprise Analytics Management System

Creation of an organizational approach to standardizing management of data, or Enterprise Analytics Management System (EAMS), results in a defined, documented and deliberately managed set of priorities, polices, procedures and processes. The EAMS should address the collection, definition, analysis, interpretation, translation and presentation of data to a wide variety of audiences.

Objectives for the EAMS are to:

  • Transition from a data and analytics departmental/siloed approach to a clear, consistent enterprise approach to managing data assets
  • Ensure key stakeholders understand enterprise analytics assets and have a consistent methodology for working together across the organization
  • Clearly define an enterprise analytics organization and operating model
  • Build a culture of collaboration and accountability to support data and analytics
  • Design and implement an oversight process or governance process
  • Develop an Enterprise Analytics Strategy and Pragmatic Road Map for the next few years

For data to truly be the star of the show, we must improve our ability to govern and manage this critically important asset.

 

Disruptive Innovation v. EHR Optimization: Is the Tail Wagging the Dog?

Disruptive innovation in healthcare will depend on new combinations of data, technology and business models to create new interactions with health and healthcare consumers. In a NEJM Catalyst Marketplace Survey, healthcare executives, clinical leaders, and clinicians ranked the healthcare sectors in most need of disruption. The top three sectors were hospitals and health systems (65%), healthcare IT vendors (47%), and primary care (36%). Interestingly, a dichotomy emerged when respondents considered whether buyers were willing to pay for solutions to result in disruptive innovation. Most notably, health care IT shot to the top of the list, named by half of respondents. Hospitals and health systems were second (46%).

Importance of EHR Optimization

Yet according to a recent Health Data Management survey, 72% of respondents from healthcare organizations indicate that achieving EHR optimization is either extremely important or very important for their organizations. Healthcare leaders vary in their definition of optimization. For some it consists of routine maintenance, for others it involves remediation of technical issues not addressed during implementation, and for others it includes the addition of new functionality. The performance-improvement minded define optimization as including standardization of workflows, improved use of data and application of best practices. There are three problems with this thinking:

  • At best optimization produces incremental performance improvement and change, resulting in a nominal return on investment and value,
  • Second, optimization is focused on the technology not the healthcare business or clinical problem to be solved – resulting in the proverbial technology tail wagging the dog, and finally
  • There is a perception that disruptive innovations must come from outside the industry, and if the data and technology leaders are “heads-down” focused on optimization, they may miss the chance to drive real change

Solving Narrow Business and Clinical Problems is the Key to Disruptive Innovation

Disruptive innovation requires one to solve the business and clinical problems of the industry. These problems are big, complex and often beyond the control of individual practitioners and health systems. For the best lesson on addressing complex problems, we can look within our own industry. Cancer, once a death sentence, was the focus of doctors and researchers for years. The common thinking was that a single cure for all forms of the disease would be the answer. Physician Sid Mukherjee, author of book The Emperor of All Maladies, describes the first breakthrough.  Sidney Farber, now known as the Father of Modern Chemotherapy, decided to focus exclusively on treating leukemia. By narrowing his focus Farber was able to make remarkable progress against this single condition. As a result, his work led to new protocols and treatments for other cancers. According to Mukherjee, “focusing microscopically on a single disease, one could extrapolate into the entire universe of diseases.” The healthcare industry can learn and apply this lesson – to solve solve large complex problems, first attack smaller micro-problems.

Move to the Next Level of Value & Return on Investment

There exists a full spectrum of high-impact value that can be realized and created when investments in HIT and digital tools are applied to solving healthcare business and clinical problems. The Healthcare Value Pathway illustrates the next levels of value and return on investment.

Key steps include:

  • First of all, start with a narrow focus on a specific problem such as the historic under-investment in primary care, the cost of a hospital stay, patients with multiple chronic conditions, the disparities in access or challenges in transitions of care
  • Next explore specific innovations such as:
    • Design new business and care delivery models
    • Develop new networks new networks of patients and providers
    • Create new approaches to sharing information
    • Reinvent work processes, decision making structures and roles/responsibilities
  • Analyze market, clinical, financial, claims, social determinant, etc. data to learn more about the problem to be solved
  • Finally, iterate micro-phases of designing and piloting the innovation

Oh, and what about technology? Technology is and will be pervasive in all that we do in health and healthcare. Consider as you design new innovations, potential high-impact or value-added technologies.  Rather than “wagging the technology tail”, move beyond optimization to focus value through disruptive innovation.

What Got Us Here, Won’t Get Us There: Strategic Planning for the Transition

Information and technology is becoming pervasive in all aspects of clinical care delivery and financial management of the health care enterprise.  Healthcare business, clinical and information technology leaders agree that IT is critical to population health management and value based reimbursement.  Yet, for many, day to day problems often keep IT leadership in a fire-fighting mode.  Many CIOs and healthcare business and clinical leaders find it difficult to find time to focus on the future.

Traditional healthcare information technology strategic plans were primarily consisted of a list of vendor applications and infrastructure to be deployed.  The bottom line for most healthcare organizations is that tactical IT road maps will not position the organization for tomorrow.  Segmentation of the IT strategic plan and portfolio into four primary programs can be useful in transitioning IT from a “keep the lights” on functional role to a strategic partner for the transition from volume to value.  Each quadrant has a unique role in maximizing the value IT contributes to the organization.

4 Strategic Plans

See below our thinking on each quadrant and key take-always for senior leadership

1 – Rethinking IT Organization Design & Operating Model:  Traditional IT organization structures, processes and operating models should be reconfigured to consider the healthcare enterprise of tomorrow.  Many IT organizations were founded within hospitals and those models no longer work given the level of consolidation, the requirements to support clinical integration networks, and the expectations of affiliates and partners.  New customer support functions, shared services centers and economies of scale are needed for today’s contemporary information technology services.  Collaboration with informatics, analytics, quality and security professionals is challenging traditional IT cultures and operating practices.

Key Take-Aways:  Have you redesigned the IT, Informatics, Analytics and Quality leadership and organization structure?  Do you have a plan for building new competencies?  What is the 2.0+ operating model?

2 –  Support Performance Improvement in Acute, Ambulatory & Post-Acute Care:  As pressure on healthcare costs increases and margins become more dependent of value, not volume, clinical and operations leaders will increase their collective focus on the Triple Aim, or care, health and cost.  Health systems will critically examine the clinical process, patient experience, outcomes and efficiency of care each with financial implications.  A myriad of reimbursement programs and contracts from payers will create new incentive and penalty structure for hospitals, physicians and post-acute providers.   From shared savings contracts, to bundled payments to direct to employer, each year additional measures and programs will be added.  Health systems need to improve their capabilities in business intelligence, real-time data access, and effective chronic care management

Key Take-Aways:  Have you transitioned from departmental or point enterprise performance improvement systems?  Do you have a plan for creating an analytics center of excellence?  What distinct business intelligence strategies are in place for enterprise performance improvement and population health management?

3 – Enable Health System Growth:  Consolidation, New Markets & Partnerships

Horizontal and vertical consolidation, new geographies, service lines and points along the continuum, and partnerships with other health systems, payers and new market entrants such as retail health are blurring the lines of what it means to be a health system.  Each market is different and each enterprise is different.  One size fits all strategies, or rip and replace with one core vendor are no longer viable strategies.  HFMA’s Value-Based Payment Readiness Survey ranks interoperability readiness as the weakest competency for most respondents.  Yet, it also indicates that 70 percent of financial executives anticipate their organizations will need to be extremely capable in data exchange to support value based reimbursement requirements and new market strategies in the next few years.

Key Take-Aways:  Have you developed an interoperability strategy based on the unique makeup of your enterprise, affiliates and partner readiness? Do you have a plan for identify management, access and referral management, and care coordination?  What is IT’s role in extending the enterprise and connecting the community?

4 – Drive Innovation & Transformation

Cloud computing, mHealth, patient activation and consumer engagement all come to mind when Digital Health Strategy is mentioned.  Billions of dollars have been invested in innovative start-ups and new transformative tools.  Yet, security risks are increasing daily.  Well beyond portals, initiatives such as virtual visits, home monitoring, self-service scheduling and bill payment, open notes, wearables, social health communities, and the list goes on.  A recent Surescripts Survey finds “patients prefer digitally savvy doctors and demand a connected healthcare experience.”

Key Take-Aways:  Have you developed an integrated patient and consumer engagement strategy?  Do you have a patient advisory council?  What are the unique characteristics of key patient populations that could drive innovation?

The Pivot: From Compliance to Strategy

HIMSS16 – billed as the largest and most important healthcare IT conference in the United States occurred last week in Las Vegas.  The message was loud and clear – something is different; the government mandate is over.  Strategy is the new, new.

For years the HIT world has encouraged alignment of enterprise strategy and the IT plan.  Alignment suggests two distinctly different things creating a linkage or connection.  Healthcare enterprise strategy decisions such as which markets do we enter, who do we acquire, which service lines do we emphasize, and what capital investments do we make are explored at executive and board levels.  Operations and financial decisions to support our hospitals and physician practices are made within organizational silos.  Sometimes IT is at the table, but more often than not information systems professionals are called in after the fact to “implement” selected systems and tools.  Sophisticated IT organizations have created IT Strategic Plans, IT Governance structures, IT Road Maps, and IT Champions/Customer Relationship Managers.  Our challenge – separate, sometimes aligned but rarely one.

Uncertainty is the new normal.  Strategies that take years to implement, vendor partners who are all vying for the same space and the challenges of mergers and acquisitions are driving us from 1.0 healthcare – where business as usual no longer is sustainable.  We are at a cross roads.  Those of us in transition must “pivot” our viewpoint from 1.0 volume based thinking to 2.0 and beyond.

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We need fresh, new perspectives regarding the relationship between enterprise direction and the digital strategies required for the future.  New harmonized strategies will:

  • Vary by geographic market and depend on community progress toward clinical integration
  • Necessitate partnerships, alliances and consolidations – no one can fund the investment alone and no one vendor will have all the solutions
  • Require governance models that address horizontal, vertical and virtual decisions making and integrate change across multiple systems of care
  • Move from an applications focus which emphasizes feature, functionaliy to a platform focus, producing highly configurable systems which will drive standardization and enable business strategies simultaneously
  • Redesign our organization structures, leadership competencies and operating models in IT, Informatics, Analytics and Quality
  • Acknowledge our work to create systems of documentation was foundational but not the end goal; systems of insight and behavorial change are the next stages in the evolution
  • Result in convergence of people, process, information, change and technology to rationalize costs, manage risks, realize value and activate patients to become involved in their care

 

Beware Best Practices

Almost twenty years ago, in 1996 after publishing “America’s Health in Transition: Protecting and Improving Quality”  the Institute of Medicine launched a long term, ongoing concerted effort on assessing and improving the quality of healthcare.  “To Err is Human” further galvanized the national movement to improve the quality and safety of our healthcare practices by putting the spotlight on how tens of thousands of Americans die each year from medical errors.   The “Quality Chasm” report underscored the importance of a dramatically improved information technology infrastructure to support a 21st century health system.  Building blocks for such a system include an electronic health record system and national standards.  Progress has been made, the federal government has paid out over 30 billion dollars in Meaningful Use incentives as of March 2015 and impressive examples of quality improvements are frequently quoted in the literature.  Yet, most would agree that the results to-date have been underwhelming.

It is important to recognize that most implemented EHRs with a “check-the-box” mentality order to comply with Meaningful Use.   When Meaningful Use was initially launched, our team suggested that we were “enabling the dinosaur”.  And while not prehistoric, the design of today’s healthcare system does have ancient roots.    The Romans constructed buildings called valetudinaria for the care of sick slaves, gladiators, and soldiers around 100 B.C. (Heinz E Müller-Dietz, Historia Hospitalium, 1975).  In the U.S., the number of hospitals reached 4400 in 1910, when they provided 420,000 beds (U.S. Bureau of the Census, Historical Statistics of the United States 1976).  So clinical information technology was about automating existing clinical processes in hospitals (Stead 2005) rather than transforming clinical decision-making and work processes across the care continuum” (Brown, Patrick, Pasupathy 2013). 

 Separately, quality and performance improvement departments focused on deploying best practice – a method or technique that has consistently shown results superior to those achieved with other means, and that is used as a benchmark. (Wikipedia).  While best practices have their place, it is important to recognize the risks associated with emulating others when the practice depends on an antiquated business model such as hospital care. JPGshutterstock_159756653

As health systems transition from 1.0 – Bricks and Mortar Healthcare to 3.0 – Digital, Value Driven Connected Health and Healthcare, we encourage a focus on emerging practice.  A concept born in “systems thinking”, emerging practice assumes:

  • We cannot copy other organizations, use it in our organization and expect it to work given the number of variables at play
  • Intentional design of care management and business models will result in disruption of today’s best practices
  • Collaboration and integration of clinical teams, business leaders, information technology experts and data analyst will create new value
  • Big bang, long term projects are giving way to agile, experimentation where we learn to work in new and different ways
  • Rather than using our intuition or past experience to drive improvement, data driven innovation can often have more remarkable results and new practice will emerge

So, the next time someone mentions “best practice” challenge their thinking.

 

Business Plans for Affiliated Provider Solutions & Services

Despite the healthcare consolidation trend and the health system strategy to build a “System of Care” across the healthcare continuum, affiliated providers continue to be an essential element of the care delivery process in most communities. Even with strong referral management processes and systems, physicians will still refer patients to providers outside the “owned assets” of the IDN, patients will self-refer and primary care providers and specialists will create orders to be delivered outside the integrated delivery network. While most health systems are developing strategies to actively manage referral practices, even the most horizontally integrated health systems will be on a constant search for high-quality and low-cost affiliated providers to compete effectively in a value-based environment.

affiliated

Affiliated provider programs at many health systems have struggled, even with the relaxation of the Stark Laws through the Safe Harbor provisions. Simply offering a donated EHR often fails to address the expanding scope of provider organizations (e.g., practices, skill nursing facilities, home health agencies, etc.) and often ignores the evolving demands of clinical integration and accountable care models which place greater emphasis on services and technologies that complement the EHR. Providers need effective application support services, enabling technologies such as telehealth, and a health system who is continually evaluating new innovations such as wearable technologies, mHealth, analytics, etc. that work with a myriad of EHR environments including donated EHR, web/portal/HIE, call centers, cloud based scheduling, fax and direct.

Developing a Business Plan that includes services and solutions for your affiliated providers doesn’t need to be overwhelming.

Suggested steps include:

  • Step 1 – Recognize that your provider solution and service offering may start with physician practices, but will grow to include other provider settings. This may take time. While most markets share several similarities, there are unique factors that will determine when the business conditions of your market will support expanding the business plan and associated strategies to include additional care settings
  • Step 2 – Develop a standardized services and solutions catalog that your customers need, is easily understood and can be delivered with a high degree of reliability. The services and solutions may be tiered or packaged to appeal to specific groups and level of integration, and specific variations may be designed-in to allow “localization” of based on unique requirements of specific entities, markets and specialties. Yet, the important point is that it is standardized, which by definition will produce a modest set of services and solutions. When a health system allows customizations, the services and solutions catalog expands and operating costs soar
  • Step 3 – Resign yourself to the fact that your organization can’t do it all. Sourcing selected services and solutions from the catalog to value added resellers, Internet Service Providers, hardware providers, etc. will be important. The goal is to create a variable model that reduces risk, creates economies, and ultimately provides exceptional service
  • Step 4 – Determine the business (i.e., operational, organizational, & financial) model that is right for your organization. There are a number of different models that can be used. What is right for your organization will depend on its operating strategy. Key questions include:
    o Do you provide services through existing IT departments or management services organizations?
    o How are the services provided to employed providers and owned entities?
    o Is a separate services organization necessary to provide the services? Do you run the business as a profit center or cost center?
    o Are multiple entities using the services and how do you share oversight and management?
  • Step 5 – Create the go-to-market plan. Communicating the value proposition and earning the trust of customers can be the most challenging component of any business plan. This is particularly true if previous attempt to align with affiliated providers have not been successful at your organization or neighboring health systems. Pre-emptively addressing concerns, demonstrating how services have been tailored to better meet needs, illustrating the executive support, and painting a long-term vision are all required for the program to thrive.

Maestro Strategies uses our collective experience gained assisting health systems with their provider programs as well as our work launching new companies, affiliations and agencies to help explore key strategies and associated operating implications to create a vision, build a business plan and design a road map for affiliated provider services and solutions. Please contact us a insights@maestrostrategies.com to discuss the unique needs of your provider community and how the steps above could be tailored to create a Business Plan for Affiliated Provider Services and Solutions to benefit your health system.

 

Organization Design – Emerging Models for IT, Informatics, Analytics & Quality

“IT in healthcare is no longer a hero’s game” indicates one executive. CIO in healthcare stands for “Chief Infrastructure Officer” and in the future it must stand for “Information, Integration and Innovation” says a CIO who comes from outside the healthcare industry. Our “clinical informatics leaders must think more strategically” indicates a CEO. All quotes from recent interviews of executives from 60 leading health systems conducted by Maestro Strategies CEO Pam Arlotto. CEOs, CMOs, CIOs and CMIOs all indicate new leadership and organizational models are needed as the industry transitions from volume to value. As senior leadership teams tackle consolidation, clinical integration, population health management and a variety of new strategies. Traditional silo based organization structures will not drive value in tomorrow’s health and healthcare enterprise. Emerging themes include:

  • The ability to work across entities, geographies, points in the continuum, service lines, etc
  • Clinical integration is driving new organizations structures and operating models
  • Informatics is being formalized and is pivoting from a focus on technology adoption to information, people, process and change
  • Analytics skills and competencies while not new to healthcare, must evolve to meet the demands of today’s enterprise
  • Convergence of informatics, analytics and quality is needed to manage the health of populations

See a short video (~15 minute) Research Summary of the emerging organization design trends for IT, Informatics, Analytics and Quality. A more in-depth virtual or in person briefing is available for leadership teams.

 

 

ROI and Vendor Sales Strategies

Maestro Strategies has worked with numerous vendors over the years to measure and document return on investment (ROI) to support vendor and service company sales efforts. Our approach has focused on providing an objective, independent and analytical perspective on the value of the solution from the view of the healthcare customer – health system, clinician, financial executive, etc. Typically, we validate hypotheses developed in conjunction with the company, in a number of real-world customer settings and create a model that can be used to project quantitative and qualitative benefits for prospective customers. Much of our work has been focused on expanding the conversation to examine both financial return on investment as well as strategic and process value – tangible and intangible. As one would imagine, over the years we have seen products implemented that were not used by their customers, solutions implemented on top of broken processes, systems whose users resisted mandated components of the applications, and complex modules whose capabilities were only partially configured and deployed – along with products and services that drove significant value for their customers. However, in all cases, potential benefits of the solutions and ROI were not fully realized. The reasons were many – health systems implemented without redesigning processes, executive sponsors didn’t remove barriers, projects weren’t managed well, and oh yes, sometimes the products didn’t deliver promised results.

The transition from volume to value by the healthcare industry will change the rules for both solution companies and their customers. Features, functionality and demonstrations will no longer be enough to drive sales, industry consolidation will reduce the number of customers, and ultimately solutions companies that don’t produce value over the entire life cycle of their product or service (e.g. beyond sales to include implementation and support) will be replaced by those who drive value creation, realization and results. Many solutions companies are developing ROI and value realization measurement tools and methodologies. Maestro’s experience in working tells us that often solution companies and their healthcare provider clients have different goals for the relationship, different perspectives on the value question and different language in explaining benefits.

Presentation1 Different Definitions of Value

 A Joint Value Management Plan that maps out agreed upon initiatives, value targets, milestones and accountabilities is essential to drive successful adoption, use and value creation/realization. Sometimes separate initiatives are occurring in parallel with the implementation and attribution becomes challenging.  Maestro works with both the solutions provider and their client to define common definitions of value and ROI, validate actual realization, understand key levers and accountabilities that will ensure ongoing value.

White Paper — From the Playing Field to the Pressbox: The Strategic Role of the Chief Health Information Officer (CHIO)

Based on dozens of interviews with health systems across the US and additional research, this report looks at where CHIOs and their teams are headed amid tumultuous change in healthcare. Originally seen as the stewards of CPOE and Meaningful Use — and known as the Chief Medical Informatics Officer — the Chief Health Information Officer is now tasked with ambitious information technology initiatives spanning the health continuum, retail health and consumer engagement, and population health management. Historically, limited in its authority and with few resources for support, this emerging role is a key player who must collaborate with Chief Innovation Officers, Chief Transformation Officers, and CIOs to drive clinical integration, care coordination and value realization.

To download your copy of the white paper, click here:  From the Playing Field to the Press Box.