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White Paper — From the Playing Field to the Pressbox: The Strategic Role of the Chief Health Information Officer (CHIO)

Based on dozens of interviews with health systems across the US and additional research, this report looks at where CHIOs and their teams are headed amid tumultuous change in healthcare. Originally seen as the stewards of CPOE and Meaningful Use — and known as the Chief Medical Informatics Officer — the Chief Health Information Officer is now tasked with ambitious information technology initiatives spanning the health continuum, retail health and consumer engagement, and population health management. Historically, limited in its authority and with few resources for support, this emerging role is a key player who must collaborate with Chief Innovation Officers, Chief Transformation Officers, and CIOs to drive clinical integration, care coordination and value realization.

To download your copy of the white paper, click here:  From the Playing Field to the Press Box.

Reduce Complexity and Deliver Value: Lean Business Intelligence & Analytics

Health executives have realized for a long time that future success is tied to the quality of their information.   Finance organizations have worked with costing, budgeting and financial decision support systems for years.  Supply chain executives have created reporting tools to manage inventory, distribution and cost.  Operations leaders have reported quality, productivity and performance improvement metrics.  Yet, as we move from fee-for-service to value based care, many are challenged with the terms Business Intelligence, Analytics and Population Health Management.  With hundreds of new vendors entering the marketplace and knocking on health system doors, we have moved to a new “wild, wild west” – one that can be very confusing. Most health systems already have an extensive array of capabilities around analytics including point systems (e.g., what their surgery system can report), multiple data repositories with duplicate but often conflicting information, and capabilities provided by existing core vendors. Additionally, there are oftentimes hundreds  of data analysts across the organization that are managing and massaging scorecards, gathering and interpreting data from multiple internal and external sources, and creating literally thousands of excel and other “one-off” analyses.  This creates a complex assortment of information for decision makers, and begs the question: “What is truth and where does it lie?”.  To further complicate the situation, the mergers, acquisitions and the rapid deployment of electronic health records and other advanced clinical systems in recent years have made the identification of real “knowledge” a continuing challenge. And the sad fact is that most organizations spend the majority of their time collecting data and very little time analyzing that data. As we move from volume to value, it will be critical that organizations have a way to quickly collect the data, dedicate a more thorough effort to understanding what the data means and then acting on the data to produce results.  In other words:  Organizations must become data-driven in the decision they make at both the strategic and operational level. What most health systems don’t have is a comprehensive plan for data. They lack organizational accountability for data management or a process for ensuring data integrity, standards for collecting, aggregating, normalizing and presenting the data, and governance approaches to reducing duplication, complexity or political arguments over control.   A Business Intelligence and Analytics Strategy can help address some of these challenges, and should begin with answers to four questions:

  • What are the important enterprise business drivers and priorities that information must support?
  • How are strategic and operational decision made today and what changes must occur to move to an information driven decision making process?
  • How will you launch an early stage data governance and stewardship process?
  • What leadership input is needed to oversee and coordinate Business Intelligence? What talent is currently available within the enterprise and what is needed? Is the function centralized, decentralized or a hybrid structure?

Then, and only then, can a strategy around architecture, tools, and technology be defined. Depending on the evolution of your enterprise strategy and the level of risk managed, the requirements and investment vary. Rather than adding further complexity through new layers of tools, technologies and systems, the development of an enterprise Business Intelligence Strategy can provide a short term (12-18 month) plan to ensure that overall gaps are identified, existing systems are leveraged, skills of existing analysts are utilized, decision making structures are fine-tuned, and additional tools are selected in a rational manner.

Evolution of Business Intelligence Requirements & Investment  Evolution of BI Requirements and Investment chart 2

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Healthcare Governance: What Boards Need To Know (Part Two)

RECORDED WEBINAR
In the second of two webinars from the Center for Healthcare Governance on the topic of leadership decision making, Making Effective Decisions In Times of Uncertainty and Change: What Boards Need To Know (Part Two), Pam Arlotto and Susan Irby of Maestro Strategies apply the decision-making framework introduced in Part One to examples from the health care delivery system.

Focusing on two dimensions of the framework as applied in an emergency room setting – complex and chaotic decisions – the presenters will help listeners appreciate a new model that has important utility in today’s complex environment. Participants will learn about the role of business intelligence, analytics and information in making decisions in a new way in a more hectic and complex environment laced with great uncertainty. Understand how information-driven decision making is different from the hierarchical, command-and-control models that we have used in the past – and is increasingly more appropriate for a transformed business model.

Access the recording here.

Also be sure to watch part one of this series — Making Effective Decisions In Times of Uncertainty and Change: What Boards Need To Know

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Innovation that Sticks — Podcast Episode #24: Realizing the Value of Health IT

With all the focus on the implementation of health IT and meeting meaningful use, Pam Arlotto, Maestro’s President and CEO, suggests that organizations take a step back and realize ‘why’ they’re making the investment in health IT systems. She believes that innovation within healthcare needs to be holistic and systemic to manage new technologies so that value can be realized. (Episode #24 of an ongoing HIMSS podcast series.)

Click here and scroll to Episode #24 to listen to this complimentary podcast